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CURRENT EVENTS

Panel: 10-percent Limit on Daily Sugar Intake
February 22, 2015
A group of government-appointed nutritional experts is recommending that Americans limit their daily sugar intake to 10 percent of total calories. If the recommendation is part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services dietary guidelines, which are due out later in 2015, it will be the first such strict limit on sugar intake. Guidelines issued in previous years have urged Americans to cut back on sugar but included no numerical target. The 10-percent figure is equivalent to 12 teaspons of sugar, or the amount contained in one typical 16-ounce sugary drink.

Virtual Schools Gaining Traction in Wake of Storms
February 22, 2015
More and more schools are assigning work to students even when schools are shut because of snow and ice. As the cold, icy, and snowy weather continues to hit much of the United States, schools are turning increasingly to electronic methods of instruction and assessment. Some schools, such as a high school in Minnesota, have been doing this for awhile now. In the latest storm, 13 public school districts in Kentucky got the go-ahead from their state bosses to trial virtual schooling, assigning work to students electronically. Teachers, also required to be available online during the school day, then monitored the students' work online. Alternately, students who did not have access to computers or the Internet at home were given paper materials, with instruction to have all assignments completed within a certain timeframe.

THIS WEEK IN HISTORY

Supreme Court Establishes Judicial Review
On Feb. 24, 1803, the U.S. Supreme Court announced its decision in Marbury v. Madison, the first case in which anything was declared unconstitutional. This was the case of John Adams and his frantic appointment of the "Midnight Judges." The Court, under Chief Justice John Marshall, asserted itself as the arbitrator of laws and acts of Congress and how those laws and acts could be thought as consistent with the Constitution or, in this case, unconstitutional.

 

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