Slavery in America

 

Slavery in America began in 1607 and continued until 1865. These links tell you more about this controversial but, for a long time, legal practice.


Slavery in America
The major elements of the story, from beginning to end.

The First Slave Ship in America
It arrived in 1619 in the Virginia colony.

The Middle Passage
The deadly journey from Africa across the Atlantic to the New World

Slave Codes and Laws
Laws in every state (not to mention the federal government) protected slavery and prescribed punishments far and wide

The Three-fifths Compromise
Slavery is enshrined in the Constitution in the form of this political deal on taxes and representation that resulted in slaves' being counted as less than a person

Slave Plantations
One of the enduring symbols of the slavery system

Slave Rebellions
Some did adopt violent means to try to escape slavery

The Amistad Rebellion
This uprising ended happily for most of the slaves who seized control of a Spanish slave ship

Nat Turner's Rebellion
The most well-known slave-led revolt in America

Abolition of Slavery in America
The major people and events in the long struggle

Foes of Slavery
These African-Americans are famous for fighting against slavery.

Remembering Slavery: Those Who Survived Tell Their Stories
Read about slavery in the words of the people who lived it and lived to tell about it.

Slavery in the U.S.
This site covers all aspects of the topic

Timeline of Slavery in America
From 1619 to 1865

Slave Life and Slave Codes
Legal basis for mistreating a great many people

Thomas Paine Speaks Out Against Slavery
This article was published in newspapers in 1775.

The Underground Railroad
Links, articles, pictures, stories, primary sources, and much more about this "route to freedom" followed by a great many slaves

The Thirteenth Amendment
The Thirteenth Amendment abolished slavery. The passage of this amendment wasn't a foregone conclusion, though.

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Social Studies for Kids
copyright 2002–2020
David White