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Carthage

 Related Terms

• Dido
• 
Hanno
• 
Rome
• 
Roman Republic
• 
Punic Wars
• 
Hamilcar Barca
• 
Hannibal
• 
Julius Caesar
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Phoenicians
• 
Byblos
• 
Canaan
• 
Sidon
• 
Tyre

 

Definition: Ancient city that began as a sea-trading center. Legend says that Dido, princess of Tyre, founded Carthage. The city grew and grew, building a large Mediterranean trade base and conquering neighboring territories and peoples. Hanno and other sailors charted new lands. The Carthaginian army and navy soon grew very large. Carthaginian colonies on Sardinia and Sicily came into conflict with Rome, and the Punic Wars began. They were three in number, and Rome won all three. Carthaginian General Hamilcar Barca fought Rome in the First Second Punic War. The Second Punic War was the most devastating. This war featured the Carthaginian general Hannibal (Hamilcar Barca's son) and his famous march over the Alps to the very gates of Rome. Hannibal won several brilliant victories but was ultimately defeated and exiled. This was the end of the Second Punic War. Many years later, Rome provoked an attack by Carthage, igniting the Third Punic War. Rome was vicious in victory, burning Carthage to the ground and sowing salt into the ground. Eventually, the Romans rebuilt Carthage, strictly as a Roman colony. It came to prominence once more, mainly at the insistence of Julius Caesar.

Related Resources:
Ancient Rome
Learn more about the fascinating story of Rome.

Elsewhere on the Web:
Ancient Carthage
From humble beginnings, Carthage rose to a position of unbridled power.

The Carthaginian Empire
Discover how the people of one great city built an empire.

Punic History
The word "Punic" comes from Latin. It means "Carthaginian." Read about the history here.

The Story of Carthage and Rome
Was conflict between these two Mediterranean powers inevitable? Find out here.

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