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Doctors Prescribing Fruits, Veggies to Fight Obesity
July 28, 2013
Children's hospitals across the U.S. are prescribing fruits and vegetables in an effort to address an increasing rate of childhood obesity.

Google to Fund Free Wi-Fi in San Francisco
July 24, 2013
Google will provide fee Wi-Fi to parks and open spaces across San Francisco. The Internet search engine provider will fund the program with a $600,000 grant. The San Francisco Department of Technology and a citizens group will do the installation and network maintenance at the 31 locations across the City by the Bay. The network will be running by spring 2014.

Digital Boosts Comics Sales to Lofty Heights
July 22, 2013
Comic books are alive and thriving, thanks in increasing part to the advent of digital. In a way that coffee table books and technical manuals don't necessarily, comics lend themselves more to a digital presentation. This is borne out by a huge increase in sales of "electronic" comics in the past year.

Original Basketball Rules Get Permanent Home
April 18, 2013
The rules of basketball will have a new home. The original two-page document containing James Naismith's 13 basic rules sold at auction in 2010 for $4.3 million. (At the time, it was the highest price ever paid for sports memorabilia.) An alumnus of the University of Kansas, where Naismith once coached, bought the rules, which will be displayed at a new center on the university campus.

Huge American Digital Library Unveiled
April 18, 2013
The Digital Public Library of America is online. The Digital Public Library of America (DPLA) is a massive online collection of materials from libraries, museums, and archives. Viewers can look up all manner of things and see all kinds of images, maps, and the like from years past. The DPLA will also make it data available for developers who want to create software applications (specifically mobile apps).

Iditarod Winner Oldest Ever
March 13, 2013
Keeping the winning in the family, Mitch Seavey won the 2013 Iditarod, becoming the oldest winner a year after his son Dallas scored a win as the youngest-ever. Mitch Seavey, 53, reached the finish line in Nome a mere 9 days, 7 hours, 39 minutes, and 56 seconds after the traditional start in Anchorage.

Twinkies Back on Shelves Soon, New Owners Vow
March 12, 2013
Hostess will sell Twinkies and other iconic brands to a pair of buyers, who promise that Twinkies will be back on shelves soon.

Bob Hope 'Spaceship' House Up for Sale
March 11, 2013
A futuristic-looking house once owned by legendary American entertainer Bob Hope is on the market. Hope's daughter, Linda, has announced the sale, at $50 million. The 23,000-square-foot house has six bedrooms, 10 bathroom, and three half-bathrooms. The property includes a tennis court, a putting green, a pond, and two pools, one of which is shaped in the profile of Hope himself. An open-air courtyard enhances the look, which resembles a spaceship.

Judge Strikes Down NYC Sugary Drink Ban
March 11, 2013
New York City's ban on large sugary drinks is on hold, pending an appeal in state courts. A State Supreme Court judge has halted the ban, a day before it was to take effect, saying that the ban applied standards inconsistently. For example, the judge said, the Board of Health's plan would ban single sales of sugary drinks in sizes larger than 16 ounces but would not stop consumers from buying multiple 16-ounce size drinks. Also, the judge noted, the ban applied to some restaurants but not convenience stores.

State Park to Honor Harriet Tubman
March 10, 2013
A new Maryland state park will honor Harriet Tubman, the "Moses of Her People." Ground was broken to mark the 100th anniversary of her death. Speaking at the ceremony was Patricia Ross-Hawkins, one of Tubman's distant relatives. Also on the program were a speech by Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley, and a stage presentation by a Tubman re-enactor, and songs by a local church choir.

Japan Upgrades Tsunami Warning System
March 10, 2013
To mark the second anniversary of one of the most devastating earthquakes in recent memory, Japan has unveiled an upgrade to its warning system, even as the cleanup continues in Japan and across the Pacific.

Bob Hope 'Spaceship' House Up for Sale
March 11, 2013
A futuristic-looking house once owned by legendary American entertainer Bob Hope is on the market. Hope's daughter, Linda, has announced the sale, at $50 million. The 23,000-square-foot house has six bedrooms, 10 bathroom, and three half-bathrooms. The property includes a tennis court, a putting green, a pond, and two pools, one of which is shaped in the profile of Hope himself. An open-air courtyard enhances the look, which resembles a spaceship.

Judge Strikes Down NYC Sugary Drink Ban
March 11, 2013
New York City's ban on large sugary drinks is on hold, pending an appeal in state courts. A State Supreme Court judge has halted the ban, a day before it was to take effect, saying that the ban applied standards inconsistently. For example, the judge said, the Board of Health's plan would ban single sales of sugary drinks in sizes larger than 16 ounces but would not stop consumers from buying multiple 16-ounce size drinks. Also, the judge noted, the ban applied to some restaurants but not convenience stores.

State Park to Honor Harriet Tubman
March 10, 2013
A new Maryland state park will honor Harriet Tubman, the "Moses of Her People." Ground was broken to mark the 100th anniversary of her death. Speaking at the ceremony was Patricia Ross-Hawkins, one of Tubman's distant relatives. Also on the program were a speech by Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley, and a stage presentation by a Tubman re-enactor, and songs by a local church choir.

'Sequestration' New Term for Government Budget Battles
February 10, 2013
The deal done by Democrats and Republicans to avoid America's going over the "fiscal cliff" resulted in a rise in taxes for some members of the economy but did not eliminate a series of spending cuts that will take effect on March 1 unless Congress acts again. The term now being used to describe these spending cuts is "sequestration," a rather large word that means, basically, "seize and hold." If Congress does not pass a bill by the end of this month and the President does not sign that bill, the U.S. Treasury is under obligation to "sequester" a large amount of funds to help offset the Government's growing deficit.

Alamo Visitors to View 'Victory or Death' Letter
February 10, 2013
Visitors to the Alamo will soon be able to read the famous letter written by the commander of the Texans who died there.

Monopoly Fans Say Cat Hot, Iron Not
February 6, 2013
Furry friends trumped household items in the recently completed Monopoly token contest. Joining the current cast of tokens will be the cat, the choice of 31 percent of people who voted via an online contest. According to Monopoly manufacturer Hasbro, the cat replaces the iron, which received the least support.

No More Saturday Postal Deliveries
February 6, 2013
The U.S. Postal Service will stop Saturday delivery, unless Congress objects. Postmaster General Patrick Donahoe said that the practice of delivering direct mail and magazines on Saturdays would stop in the first week of August. Donahoe said that the move would save the Postal Service more than $2 billion a year.

Barge Accident Closes Mississippi River
January 28, 2013
The headaches continue for farmers and others shipping goods in barges up and down the Mississippi River. In the latest delay, a 16-mile stretch of the river near Vicksburg, Miss., was closed after one of a pair of barges that hit a railroad bridge then leaked a large amount of oil into the river. As a result, more than 300 barges were delayed, 142 going north and 162 going south.

'Flipped Learning' Turning Up in More Schools
January 28, 2013
Modern technology is enabling teaching possibilities that turn expected education models on their head. One example is "flipped learning." In direct opposition to the traditional method of class time consisting of teacher lecture and instruction and out-of-class time consisting of homework, some schools across the country are proceeding with a different model, in which teachers use class time to focus students' learning on the lecture that students have already watched online before class. Teachers make and upload videos of their lectures, some as simple as a whiteboard presentation before a static camera, others as complicated as time and technological knowledge allow. Then, students view the videos online in their own time and come to class with questions that are answered by either the teacher or by other students, in small group discussions.

Some Childcare Centers Struggling to Meet Nutrition Requirements
January 24, 2013
Although some cities and states have reported a drop in childhood obesity, they are the exception, as the rate of children overweight continues to be high across the U.S.

Social Security Checks Go Electronic
January 23, 2013
Social Security payments will be electronic beginning March 1. In a move announced in 2011, the U.S. Treasury will stop sending benefit checks in the mail to nearly 5 million Americans and require recipients to provide information for electronic deposits, in a bank account or on a Treasury-issued debit card.

Money Tips for Teens, Parents
January 23, 2013
A new publication from the FDIC is full of money tips for teens. The primer, titled "For young adults and teens: Quick tips for managing your money," is 12 pages of information that many teens and their parents will find helpful in terms of paying for college or a car, saving money in the short term and the long term, building and keeping a solid credit record, and avoiding monetary fraud.

3-month Grace Period for NYC Sugary Drink Ban
January 15, 2013
New York's food sellers will get three months of warnings before having to pay fines for violating the city's ban on large sugary drinks.

Texas Library to Offer Only E-Books
January 14, 2013
Readers in a Texas county will have to borrow electronic books from this fall, when the library rids its shelves of printed books completely.

5 States Move to Longer School Year
January 13, 2013
Students in five states will go to school longer this year than their counterparts in the rest of the U.S., under a pilot program launched by the Department of Education.

Harsh Weather Continues to Threaten after Hottest Year on Record
January 9, 2013
Harsh, dry weather continues to affect the U.S., with record highs in temperatures and record lows in water levels and crop conditions. The U.S. Government has a declared a natural disaster area in large parts of Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, and Texas, making the major wheat-growing states eligible for low-interest emergency loans. Between them, the four states grow one-third of entire wheat crop of the country.

Barge Traffic to Continue on Mississippi River
January 7, 2013
The Mississippi River will remain open to barge traffic, but only just. The river, which routinely sports some of the largest numbers of barge transports in the U.S., is at record low levels following the harshest drought in decades.

Interest Rising for Wonder, Other Hostess Breads
January 6, 2013
Hostess looks to have buyers for its Wonder and other bread brands. A newspaper has reported that Flowers Floods and Grupo Bimbo are in discussion with Hostess to purchase Wonder, Nature's Pride, and other of Hostess bread brands. None of the three companies had public comment, but the report, from the Wall Street Journal, said that an announcement could come this week.

'Fiscal Cliff' Deal Saves Big Hurt, Creates More Anxieties
January 2, 2013
The deal struck by Democrats and Republicans to avert the worst of the twin-whammy tax increases and spending cuts, the so-called "fiscal cliff," has relaxed several anxieties while creating some more.

10 States Raise Minimum Wage
January 2, 2013
A total of ten states have raised the minimum wage to start off 2013. Arizona, Colorado, Florida, Missouri, Montana, Ohio, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont, and Washington all raised the minimum wage. The amount of the increase varied, from 10 cents to 35 cents.

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