America to Trump: You're Hired

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2016 Election

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November 8, 2016

Donald Trump, after a long and hard-fought campaign, has been elected President of the United States. Trump, the businessman and reality television star, had defeated 16 other candidates in the Republican Party primaries to secure the nomination.

Trump made quite a name for himself by defeating other seasoned campaigners and was quite an unconventional candidate, having never held elective office and conducting his campaign in many ways not seen before. His campaign won the support of many who felt disenfranchised by the system.

Clinton herself had to fend off a furious primary challenge by Vermont's Bernie Sanders. As in 2008, Clinton was the front-runner for the Democratic Party nomination but found herself having to campaign long and hard just to win the nomination.

The two nominees clashed in three well publicized television debates and traded charges throughout the campaign. Both nominees endured their share of controversies and scandals, but both nominees endured until the end, when the votes were counted and a winner was declared.

Trump had cast himself as an agent of change. He campaigned on the theme, and he cast his general election opponent, Clinton, as a symbol of the kind of Washington "Old Guard" that he was determined to avoid emulating.

In the end, Clinton won more popular votes than Trump did. But where the American presidential election is won, in the Electoral College, Trump got more votes than Clinton did in enough states to get to the necessary number of 270 (out of 538) and won the election. Clinton thus become the fifth presidential candidate to win the popular vote yet lose the electoral vote. (The others were Andrew Jackson in 1928, Samuel J. Tilden in 1876, Grover Cleveland in 1888, and Al Gore in 2000.)

Trump won all of the states that the two previous Republican nominees, Mitt Romney and John McCain, won, and he added a few more that put him over the top, like Pennsylvania (which had been in the Democratic column since 1992) and Ohio (which had gone for Barack Obama twice) and Florida (which had gone for Obama twice and which was supposedly a lock for Clinton) and even Wisconsin (a usually reliable Democratic state).

Trump won the support of many who felt disenfranchised and who felt let down by the current administration. In particular, many states whose populations had fallen on hard times recently went for Trump's appeal for change.

The new Vice-president is Indiana Gov. Mike Pence. Clinton's running mate was Tim Kaine, a Senator from Virginia.

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David White